Expecting about 45 Navajo-Churro Lambs in April of 2020 – stay tuned to our Facebook Page for latest news!

Mr. BB Ibero and Mr. Freckles are two of our flock sires
for our 2020 lamb crop.  BB Ibero took reserve grand champion in yearling ram class in 2018. Both have taken first place and better on their fleeces. Contact us if you are interested in purchasing breeding stock.  Our entire flock is registered and we have long pedigrees for most of our lambs.  Visit our Facebook page for latest news  https://www.facebook.com/churrosheeparriolasunshinefarm/

Flock sires 2020 lamb crop.

We are expecting beautiful lambs out of  Lady, Sofia and Lil’ Merci!

Surfer Girl and lambs

Shave’em to Save’em Navajo Churro Heritage Sheep – Wool, Roving and Yarn

At Arriola Sunshine Farm we have a wide selection of raw fleece, roving and some yarn available for participants in the Livestock Conservancy Shave’to Save’em program

At this time we are taking orders via this website and our Facebook page. Soon we will be launching an on-line store that will expedite sales process for our customers. You may find out more about the program at rarewool.org.

https://www.facebook.com/churrosheeparriolasunshinefarm/

Our flock is 100% registered with the Navajo-Churro Association and our focus has been primarily on breed conservation. All of our sheep fall within the breed standards and we have placed well at sheep and wool shows. When you purchase from us, you are purchasing genuine Navajo-Churro wool and you are helping us conserve genetics important to the continuance of this breed and the traditional shepherding and fiber arts cultures that created this fascinating breed.

Here are some examples of what we have available. You must contact us for details and to place an order.

Navajo-Churro wool Roving – shades of grey, almost black, white, medium brown, tan and off-white.
Raw fleece from mature ewe – brown fading to white.
Raw fleece – A hogget from ewe lamb.

Hand Spun Yarn

Contact Us On Facebook about Navajo-Churro sheep for sale  or fill out the form below.

2019 Navajo Churro Lambs

We have 46 healthy, bouncing Navajo-Churro lambs on the ground.  Here are a few photos. All are from registered dams and sires. Our breeding lambs will be ready for their new homes in late summer – early fall 2019.   We take deposits to reserved lambs and usually sell out by the end of summer. Please contact us if you are interested in our breeding stock. 

 

 

 

 

Baby with her ewe lamb.

Navajo-Churro Lamb Meat

If you are interested in ordering Navajo-Churro lamb, please use the contact us link to get information.  We sell first come first serve.  At this point in time we are NOT shipping meat.  However we will work with you if you are in the vicinity of Durango CO.  Our next lambs will be ready for processing in March.

The price for a whole Lamb is $250 to $325 and is based on weight at time of slaughter. You may choose a larger or smaller animal depending on availability. To reserve a lamb: We charge a $50 deposit to hold it for you. We will bill you for the remaining amount on March 7th prior to slaughter.

Delivery to Sunnyside Meats in Durango CO on March 11th, 2019 – This is offered as a convenience to our customers at no charge (normally$25). You will be responsible for paying Sunnyside Meats for slaughter fee and cut/wrap fees – this will depend on size of animal and how you have your meat cut and wrapped but averages $90. See Sunnyside Meats website for details on processing options.  You will be responsible for picking your meat up when it is done.  The average yield is 20-35 pounds (in the box) depending on size of animal and how you have your meat cut and wrapped.
Contact us if interested and we will send you detailed ordering information.

Reserve a freezer lamb.

 

Champion Navajo-Churro Sheep and Wool

ArS Mr. BB Iberoson – Reserve Grand Champion N-CSA 2018 Show

ArS Pretty Girl, First Place Yearling ewe N-CSA 2018

ArS Shiela took Best of Show at the 2018 N-CSA Wool Show

ArS JJ Iberoson took Grand Champion Ram at N-CSA 2018 Wool Show.

 

ArS Moon Lady took Reserve Grand Champion at the 2018 N-CSA Wool Show

 

 

Attend the Navajo-Churro Sheep Assoc. Annual Celebration

September 20-23rd 2018
Cortez Colorado

Enjoy learning about fiber arts & crafts, watch Navajo-Churro sheep and wool shows, visit vendors booths, hearing speakers, and great food and more.  Contact us to request program and travel details. 
Click here to contact us for program and travel details

Thursday September 20th
10 am to 5 pm: Participate in our all day “Spin-Off” featuring fiber arts and crafts including weaving, felting, spinning, dying, carding and other aspects of wool. Bring your own project or learn from hands-on demonstrations provided by Dine Be Iina, Navajo Lifeways and other fiber arts enthusiasts. Learn about Navajo and Hispanic perspectives and history relation to sheep.

7 pm to 9 pm: Learn about Navajo-Churro Sheep. Dr. Lyle McNeal, Carnegie Professor, Livestock & Range Specialist at College of Agriculture & Applied Sciences, Utah State University. As founder of the Navajo Sheep Project he will speak about the significance of Navajo-Churro Sheep as a land race and his 40 years of experience in helping save this breed from extinction.

Friday September 21st – Daytime
9:00 am Doors open. Vendors and information booths open all day. 9:30am Understanding the N-CSA Database & Registry

10:30 am “Weavings of the Four Corners: From Cotton to Wool.” Travel through time with Navajo fiber artist Zefren Anderson of Zefren M-Weavings, as he explores the history of fiber use in our region.

1:00 pm Juried Navajo-Churro Fleece Show and Clinic. First, second and third place awards for each class , plus champion ram and ewe and best of show awards. E-mail for details.

3:00 pm   Mini-workshops, demonstrations, and round-table discussions. Shop vendors booths &the N-CSA Silent Auction.

Evening Dinner and Keynote Speaker Friday September 21st

5:30 pm enjoy dinner featuring Navajo-Churro Lamb. YOU MUST RSVP. Cost is $15 per plate for adults, $8.00 for children. Pay at door.  Contact us to RSVP.

7:00 pm KEYNOTE SPEAKER Dr. Alison Martin PhD, Executive Director of the Livestock Breeds Conservancy, will discuss the work of her organization and significance conserving endangered livestock breeds.
Anyone interested in heritage horses, poultry, rabbits, sheep, goats, cattle & pigs will enjoy this presentation. 

Saturday September 22nd
7:30 am Membership breakfast and meeting. RSVP for breakfast ($5)

9:00 am   Vendors and information booths open all day. 9:30am

9:00 am Dr. Allison Alison Martin, Executive Director of Livestock Breeds Conservancy will present on Genetics and Breeding Practices for livestock conservation with focus on sheep.

12: 00 – 3:00 pm   Enjoy watching our Juried Navajo-Churro Sheep Show. First, second and third place awards for each class , plus champion ram and ewe and best of show awards. E-mail for details.

3:00 pm   The N-CSA general silent auction ends. You must be present.3:30 pm   Sheep Registration Clinic. Breeders will have sheep inspected. Everyone will learn about breed characteristics and qualities.

5:00 pm Closing comments. Vendors booths close.

Sunday Sept. 23rd—Enjoy an Open Gate farm tour.
Learn about Holistic Management Grazing planning, irrigation mgt., soil health, grass fed beef and lamb production, and more. Contact us to register. Fee of $25 includes lunch.‎

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



 

No “Snow Days” for Sheep Producers

Feeding Sheep in Snow

Ranching is a 24/7 job.   Most family farmers and ranchers are dependent on their own labor and that usually means there are no “snow days”.   Livestock must always be tended to no matter what else is happening.  The vast majority of Americans are 3 or more generations removed from the rigors of farm life.  Yet they are dependent on farmers and ranchers to supply safe, healthy, affordable food.  Here we are feeding the sheep, on time, in a mid February blizzard.

Our next lamb crop is due in April.  Feeding our Navajo-Churro ewes on time and with the correct amounts  is essential to healthy lamb development. Especially in the third trimester where most of the growth happens and thus the greatest demand on the ewe’s resources.